Skip to main content

About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CNBC 39
CSPAN2 19
FBC 12
CNNW 11
CSPAN 11
KQED (PBS) 2
LINKTV 2
KCSM (PBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
MSNBCW 1
WBAL (NBC) 1
WHUT (Howard University Television) 1
LANGUAGE
English 105
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 106 (some duplicates have been removed)
're looking at relatively flattish trade here in europe on christmas eve. let's recap off of what we've seen in asia in the overnight session here. you're looking at slight gains across the board. the shanghai composite up by .25%. you're seeing similar gains in the s&p asx and the hang seng, the kospi both a couple of points up to the upside, as well. currency markets, pretty stable trade, too. we're seeing slightly lower volumes to say the least as you would anticipate here during the holiday days. we are, though, flirt, a recent high is 1.32. a couple of sessions ago, we were down at the 1.29 mark. aussie/dollar flat. sterling seeing slight gains. just to wrap things up showing you what's taking place in fixed income, relatively flattish trade, as well. the yield here on the spanish yield, 5.3%. the uk seeing yeldz slightly higher, as well. but, of course, it is christmas. it is the holiday season that we're up against. so you would anticipate that maybe some investor res closing out recent profits. sitting tight and waiting for that next year to start, karen. >> thanks very much, louisa.
in europe are trading lower as ben bernanke warns monetary policy may not be enough to offset the damage if the u.s. economy goes over the fiscal cliff. >>> and the fed takes the new and surprising step in its ongoing efforts to boost the economy, tying interest rates directly to the u.s. unemployment rate. >>> plus, investors cheering the plan to save danone's plans to offset losses over the next two years. >> announcer: you're watching "worldwide exchange," bringing you business news from around the globe. >>> welcome to the program. coming up on today's show, we'll be plenty busy. we head out to tokyo where carry enjoji has been talking about the upcoming elections. then, we hone in on central london where one pilot project is living roof and major buildings. find out what green living can do go r to improve the area. >>> and today, the 1 billionth international tourist will reportedly arrive at a destination in the world. at 11:20 central time, we'll speak to the world travel council to find out why france is still the world's top destination but more money is spent in the u.s. and c
to southern europe. >> and then south korea's presidential election, yes, it's not just japan, and what to expect from the winner. >>> let's just plug you into where we are with this global market. more now on the global trading day in europe. 5-4 advances just about outpace decliners on the dow jones stoxx 600. most european stocks were up yesterday. the dax up 13 points. the dax, second highest close of the year, still up 27.5% for the year. right now, the ftse sound, the cac kron, closed at a fresh 52-week high. and the ftse is up 13 points despite falls from italian banks. let's show you where we are as far as the bond yields are concerned. we just check in. italian yields, 4.4% on the year. we'll show you the twos and tens, as well. i'll give you more on how that compares to where we closed yesterday. so the two-year, that's the low where we were yesterday. 10-year spanish yields, 5.581%. two-year yield, 2.35%, kind of where we were yesterday, too. and they're continue to go appreciateslide slightly from yesterday's close. as far as currency markets, 1.2880 was the two-week low on
's take a look at how markets are trading. stoxx europe 600 is down about .6% this morning, this after word that house speaker john boehner's plan b didn't come to a vote last night. he couldn't get them in place apparently. we'll have plenty more on the impact of that on the program. not much here, we see decliners well outpacing advancers. the ftse mib in italy down .6%. the ibex down .4%. the dax selling off .5% lower than yesterday. same goes for the ft. if it is, down .8%. 5909. how quickly we've gone from talking about 6,000 to talking about 5,900. the german bund rallying. same goes for the uk. we're seeing a rotation into safety, out of risk and out of spain and italy. about 4.5% for italy. thin trading in markets is exacerbating the move that we're seeing as we approach the year. today, the austy dollar is weaker against the u.s. dollar by about .4%. proxy there for global growth prospects. the dollar/yen is weaker by about .25%. this as markets digest the news out of the boj and gauge whether they'll be successful in boosting inflation ultimately. the euro/dollar, 1.3221. so
. as america stood on the edge of american leadership, europe entered a decade in which it convinced itself war was impossible. the book, grand illusion, captured the view that europeans were too advanced, too sophisticated to fight each other. john maynard keynes a code this with his famous observation about how the world was tied together, how an englishman could order from his doorstep products from faraway lands and have them delivered to him. it's kind of an early version of thomas friedman's theory which claims an advanced country that used computers won't go to war with each other. i call it the starbucks to pick any two countries that have starbucks won't fight. you know, i guess unless they have like a triple espresso to another observer, in a much different way, posited that war would be so bloody and weaponry so deadly that no one would dare risk a conflict. all of these assume that european leaders would be rational, a stretch even in the present day. this, of course, vanished in august 1914, a war sparked by one of the most unlikely of accident when ferdinand on his way back from s
20 years. so look, and a lot of this is down to problems, i guess, in europe, right? what is the outlook with what happens with global growth and what is happening? >> unsurprisingly, the volume of growth of trade are strongly correlated to the volume of growth. so growth slows down. trade slows down with a sort of multiple. that's the main reason. there may be other marginal reasons like, for instance, difficulties in trade finance. which is a sort of the aftermath of the financial crisis. but the reality is that the main export market of the senate, which is europe, is not doing well. the second export market is not doing that well. not to talk about japan. so this has a slowdown effect which reverb rates on the growth of emerging countries. >> and i know when you see what's happening in italy, will this, the political developments in italy that cause more instability and less reform there, are you concerned that will have a further destabilization impact? >> no. i mean, i think it comes at a time where we are starting to see an exit, a crisis exist by europe. whether th
, but a change. you were bullish in the u.s. saying i'm going to europe and other areas. why? >> well, maybe it's controversial when you look at the headlines in europe and asia and elsewhere in the world, but our thesis is predicated primarily on what we call price matters, which is essentially evaluations so when you look at the u.s. markets, and in our opinion, u.s. markets are still relatively attractively valued because they are, on our models, 20% below long term return trend sot force of reversion works in your favor, but if you look at efa, it's further below the long term trend, 35%-40% below the long term trend, and history coral lates to strong adjusted returns over the next decade. you know, that's the long term view op places like europe and asia. the shorter term view is that our tool set for tactical moves is don't fight the fed or the trend, be aware of the crowded extremes, and like in the u.s. where the fed is on a risk market side, that's true in the ecb, a huge change. the change in the ecb leadership and the embracing of american style qe is a big reason why we went from st
on the fiscal cliff. equities falling on wednesday in the u.s. on thursday when we opened here in europe, yesterday we saw a relatively stable markets. we closed out on a flat to slightly higher note for most of our european markets yesterday. this morning coming into trade, we're pretty flat. we've taken a bit of a dropdown on this drop but we're just a couple of points lower. in the asian session overnight, we managed to see gains back again. they lost again on the notion of the fiscal cliff not happening. shanghai composite higher by just over 1% in today's session. hang seng, and the kospi closing slightly higher across the board. the european markets mixed, but the ftse 100 still flat to higher. we're all looking towards these fiscal cliff negotiations. at the moment, we've got a couple more days of trade before we get to the end of the new year, as well. most analysts out there, they've been saying we're going to see a relatively flattish end to the year from where we are now given that we've seen such an increase of equities in the past 12 months. we've seen stellar outperformance
-english-speaking immigrants-- some from europe, some from asia, buworking-class ople. and the landscape we see belows sis landscape of small houses, and the houses are very sie. and the landscape narrator most of the immigrant communities are cad which s siof nghoo thatrelmost concealed beneath the urban forest narrator: it is here in this greener, more affluent part of the city where the new asian elites have chosen to live. ma os ies are children of hong ko businessmen. their parents continue tol ma os ies in the asian omanufacturing industry. theyften commute between vancouver and hong kong. they believe the best way to preserve their wealth is to invest in real estate, and the best way for their investments appreciate is to replace older anglo-canadian housesike these with newer, larger asian-style houses like these. as developers rush to accommodate these new arrivals, ey a teariown exisng homes. ma west side residents have become concerned byhehang they see igorer w lng around them. liss i knew ts house well, because i used to play across the street from it, anit had beautiful timbe inside and oa
let between innovators coming from central europe and those coming from the plateau which has fostered a suspicious negotiation and character they can see right of into the politics in bucharest to this day and i can go to every country, not every but many countries and talk about but. >> talk for a moment about germany. one of the images germany has natural boundaries to the north and south with the alps and further burden the east and the west is flat plains, so germany had a war over the century with germany or france or that area and poland and because germany was a continental power sandwiched between the maritime europe on one hand and the heartland towards the other it was always problematic which we it would go and how it would develop. i can across this book by accident in early 1989. the berlin fall with -- berlin wall would fall but november. it had occurred to me after reading this book and other books that the berlin wall or the dividing line between eastern and western germany was one. creation of german history that would reinvested soften different territory always in t
turn away from democracy as eastern europe did 50 years ago? i talked to pulitzer prize winning historian anne happalbaum. >>> the administration had a choice save chrysler by injecting taxpayer dollars or let it fail and let it lose perhaps a million jobs. car czar steve ratner gives us a fascinating inside look. for viewers in the united states, we have a special tonight at 8:00 and 11:00 p.m. eastern and pacific called "tough decisions." >>> but, first, here's my take. announcing that he would send proposals on reducing gun violence in america to congress, president obama this week mentioned a number of sensible gun control measures. but he also paid homage to the conventional washington wisdom from mental health issues to school safety. his spokesman jay carney said earlier this is a complex problem that will require complex solution. gun control carney from the only answer. let me respectfully disagree. the problem is not complex and the solution is blindingly obvious. there are three sets of causes that people point to when talking about events like the one in newtown. fir
for the economy. and the transaction tax is being taken very seriously in europe and probably will happen there, even though the u.k. is kicking and screaming because they specialize in being the home of trading, whether trading in stocks or derivatives or anything else. they simply do not want that to be taxed. there are people in congress. i think wall street is now the number-one contributor to political campaigns. at least, it is in the running for number-one. i have been to washington many times and i'm involved with several groups that are trying to reform the business sector so that it can work, so that it can survive. it is very difficult because of the sheer amount of money that the finance sector in particular is pouring into lobbying and campaign contributions. it is very difficult. >> let's give a round of applause for lin. -- lynn. [applause] there is an opportunity for you to purchase and have the but signed. if you have court-further questions, she will be here signing books. thank you all and have a safe trip home. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [caption
that they're seeing in europe enough to keep them above the pencil line. >> what we've seen so far with today's numbers is exports are declining very sharp. they'll need asia and the u.s. to offset some of that demand weakness, but again, the biggest market for most is the euro zone. if the eurozone is performing badly, that will have a thok-on effect for those countries. >> there's a number of strategists saying after the u.s. has sort of led equities for most of the year, they're now saying europe is the place to be. from i think really the question you have to ask yourself is when cash, equities, credit, government bonds, where do you want to be. and equity in my mind mind is absolutely not. you need good growth numbers to justify the equity markets going up. now, i think there's a lot of investors looking at the yields on ghoechlt bonds or credits and that's motivating them to move into equity. i think the numbers are actually going to be relatively small. and i would certainly advocate against doing that because as you were saying, weak numbers, unless you see some much strong
previously thought, although the session still looks very much on course for another quarter here for europe. the pmi will rise above 50 that divides growth between contraction. hasn't stopped the euro/dollar from hitting a one and a half month high. i suppose we know growth is going to be anemic, but if spanish banks are getting some money, are we feeling slightly better? >> that's what euro trades on, isn't it? pmis are all very interesting for the economist. but they want bigger stories. most of the news flow, it's helpful to the euro. people have been trying to affect this rally for a while. we are close to those october highs. the news flow has been good, i would say. >> we hit, what, nearly 131.80? >> before that, we go 131.40. the enthusiasm for euro is surprisingly good. we're surprised by how far this rally has gone on pretty thin news sometimes. >> i just want to recap what we've got. eurozone finance ministers meeting in brussels. an agreement still seems pretty elusive at this moment. germany and french finance ministers have very different views about oversight of banks. and in
next month. tech stocks fall in europe after ericsson unveils a swedish crown writout related to its loss chip venture. >>> reports say the intercontinental call is in talks to buy euro next. >>> and vows to continue the current government's battle against japanese territorial claims. >>> japan's central bank has decided to extend its asset purchase program to $120 billion. it will review the bank's stance on price stability next month. abe has been putting pressure on the boj to raise its inflation target to 2% as part of efforts to fight deflation. for more on the fallout or the impact here, let's talk to luca from asia pacific. you look like you're in mourning here, but it sounds like the bank of japan has delivered pretty much what the market was looking for the. >> yes. it was delivered in order to be seen as losing independence after the campaign, very aggressive campaign from the ldp party on the bank of japan independence. actually, what -- the only policy they didn't really try, according to ldp, was being extremely aggressive, not as -- or much more aggressive than what the
. europe has also been a blend of red and green as the ft names ecb chief the person of the year. we're going to kick off with breaking news. for that would, we go to david faber. >> news on best buy, in the news yesterday. the stock up sharply. what we can tell you right now is the board of directors of best buy, and its founder, richard schultz, has been trying to put together a group to essentially buy the company in a go private transaction, have extended the deadline in which he would need to come with a bid for best buy and created a window in fact that will begin on february 1st next year and end with the end of that month on february the 28th. giving schultz the opportunity to look at not just christmas sales, but the end of their fiscal year, which will end at best buy on the 31st of january. and that window, again, will be 28 days long giving him an opportunity to continue to try to cobble together a bid with private equity firms and those who might finance a potential bid for the company at whatever price that might come at, if it were in fact to come at all. no word in te
in the overall market because of europe or something involved in the election. in other words, other than for those who are shorting or going long stocks ahead of the quarter, these earnings reports need a context to make you money. they can't be relied upon anymore because they aren't as predictive of future behavior as they once were. they are a piece of the puzzle. a part of the mosaic. but they are only one of many important parts that predicts where a stock will go over the interyacht term. that tends to be the focus that i teach on the show. and it is a teaching show. because i want you to know the metrics i'm using to pick stocks i talk about and recommend here. and pick for my charitable trust, actionalertsplus.com. i want to teach how you to listen to these calls and read the transcripts. i'm hoping this show will once and for all, because this is what i see at jim cramer on twitter constantly tell you how to evaluate your portfolio, figure out what you need to trim, what you need more of. let it help your stock selection hone your wave thinking. not mine. yours. earnings season
you very much. a key session in japan overnight. >>> as we pivot our focus to europe, you see stocks addi adding .3%. consistent with the rally we've seen over the last several trading sessions and apparently having plenty to do with the possible resolution of u.s. fiscal talks. we'll have more in a little bit. the survey also helping to lift sentiment or keep it buoyant. look at the major borses. green in the harder hit regions. ftse mib, spain up better than 1%. consistent with the rally we saw yesterday. remarkable. the xetra dax adding .1%. for its part, up to close to 30% this year. the ftse 100 adding .3. the bond space, we'll look at that and talk later about the big trades that have helped some hedge funds, for example, when it comes to greek debt. for the time being, mario's comments this summer is have techively kept the bond gleelds a tight range since then six months or so now, this is going. and differentiation across the space where italy price rising, not the case for spain which is seeing its yield up to 5.3. and i know we haven't mentioned this in a while, but i want
in yesterday's rally. we didn't get housing starts, that's earlier today. as for the picture in europe, really the stand outout here is the euro. greece getting a five notch upgrade at the s&p. our road map this morning starts with gm. government motors no more. the treasury to exit its stake in the next 12 to 18 months, purchasing 2 million shares by the end of this month. >> another challenging quarter for fedex with the blame squarely on sandy. but the stock is up pre-market. >> oracle posts a strong quarter with even stronger guidance. the season rebound in europe. no impact from the fiscal cliff. >> and ge gets boosted from ubs's key call list on the weaker than expected macro environment. still on the list is including -- well tell you in a couple of minutes. >> general motors is up sharply in the pre-market session. the treasury department says it intends to sell the rest of its stakes in gm in the next 12 to 15 months. the automaker will buy back 200 million shares from treasury for $27.50 a share. treasury says it plans to sell its other remaining shares through various means in an or
. ultimately this means that europe and the united states have less leverage in the region. this allows other countries in the region to compete or political, economic and military influence in the region. i'm looking for to hearing eyewitnesses discuss this issue today. really want to hear what you have to say. i believe that armenia, azerbaijan and georgia, trustworthy allies of the united states better realize full well that their bilateral relationships are complicated and that they have to take their immediate neighborhood into account also. with only two open borders and one of them being with iran, armenia faces the constant threat of isolation. this is a for driver in managing armenia's relationship with iran. azerbaijan has a sizable diaspora in northern iran, by vastly different strategic social and political orientation than iran's leaders. despite a potential religious incident between iran and trenton, iran has a stroke decided with armenia over the contested region. furthermore, azerbaijan and joys the solid relationship with israel. which further distances terrain from one anot
deadlocked on how to resolve this crisis. noticed it, europe and arab nations are calling on a side to step down, loo but russia, chind iran continue to back assab. it states may well lose his status as the world's sole superpower by 2030. according to new report from the nationalst intelligence council. the united states to the obama intelligence rports suggestt wo will be first among equals as asia set to surpass north america and europe combined in terms of global power. joining us now to talk about implications for the foreign policy and wha in what is happen the middle east, john negroponte, the first director of national intelligence appointed by george w. bush serving five times as an investor and in his distinguished career in intelligence and diplomacy. great to have you with us. >> thank you. lou: let's start with the middle east. president morsi, ordering the military to arrest civilians. what is your reaction? >> i just think it is administration of the precariousness of the situation in egypt, but that situation is critical. we can't afford to see egypt go over some kind of a b
europe. and these guys are good. eventually they will develop an icbm that could reach the united states. >> the iranians are being continuing to amass technologies, learning how to enrich uranium, stockpiling low enriched uranium and it's getting to a level in which particularly one of iran's major rivals in the region, israel, is sounding the alarm bells and saying that the iranians are getting too close. >> graeme lawson, a great historian of the cuban missile crisis said that the iran nuclear issue is the cuban missile crisis in slow motion. (instrumental music) >> and north korea continues to make itself heard, regularly testing nuclear missiles despite international condemnation. >> it's estimated that the next time north korea tests a nuclear weapon it could be by highly enriched uranium, whereas the last two were believed to be through the plutonium route. so this is very problematic, not just because north korea having lots of fissile material is a bad thing, but north korea has a tradition of selling off anything that can garner hard currency on the open market. >> and though t
of markets look a little bit like this. here is europe to begin with. only a few markets are open there today. among those closed include spain and germany. we're start with asia. shanghai composite is the outperformer. you saw up 1.6% there. here is a list of the markets closed across europe. germany, switzerland, germany and austria. for the bourses that are open, we can take a look at performance this morning and then we'll take a look over at the bond wall. the ftse 100 is down about .4%. ibex down .5%. not a clear picture. definitely mixed trade as people look to close out the year. the bond wall gives the sense for what kind of wall dominates. we're seeing bond yields move higher. investors are exiting the asset class today. italy around the 4.5% level. we've seen these predominant for several weeks and likely a quick check on forrus. the yen, an important one to keep an eye on, as well. dollar/yen firmer, continuing the patterns that we've seen over the last couple of trading sessions. for more on what to expect from markets today, we're joined by chris meyer, managing director and chi
will benefit and have a positive economic gai if we export lng offshore to europe, and or asia and to other countries that need our gas. melissa: we have so much natural gas unlocked as a result of fracking, the problem is, intellectually, emotionally we can never wrap our heads on exporting energy. we're sure we have to keep it all for fraaking,ç problem isç intellectually wrap our heads aroundzv exporting energy. weypúre sure to keep itç all for ourselves.ç do you think the president andç washington in general cansget over that hurdle.ç >> it is a great pointç, what you're describeç something protectionism.zvçmyv it could be a cake and eat it too scenario. within eight years or now seven years as we turn into the new 2013 year it could be $50 billion economic impact to this country. so we're tripping over dollars to try to save pennies. weemight be able to impact the ecomy here. melissa: i know but, you know, there is so much of the country, there are so many environmentalists so many people on the left who hate generating energy. they barely wt us t generate enough en
states, 7% china, 5% india, negative one in europe. in that environment you want to own a portfolio of multinational companies with dividends, global exposure, it will provide as good of a return as anything else when you have bonds and cash paying so low. as long as you understand you're in the seven, 8% environment, portfolio stocks should be part of that. david: let's talk to a guy that says full speed ahead torpedoes. he thinks it will be better than this year was. saying people are confusing pickups for heart attacks in today's market to all these problems are going to seem like nothing when we come to the big gains of next year. you really think that will bear out, and how do you invest with that kinddof optimistic strategy? >> first of all what we have seen with investor sentiment is contradictory to what we've seen with consumer sentiment and business sentiment. when you see negative investor sentiment is not just in the retail side but also the institutional side creating a great potential opportunity for performance. secondly if you take a look at kicking the can down the
. >>> and corporate news weighs on sentiment across europe. kpn shares fall after dividend and greco stocks plunges as analysts cut their outlook for the uk power group. >> okay. welcome. it's the start of a brand new week here on "worldwide exchange." and don't adjust your set, kelly and i are together. >> for once, for a day. >> but make the most of it because it won't be lasting. >> if only there were a slo-mo. >> i'm going to enjoy as much as i can of today. >> and likewise. and then we're going to have to get all of our u.s. voouers to find cnbc world because they could get three hours of you, carol and carolin for the rest of the week. >> whatever they can do. record it and fast forward to the good bits. >> yeah. >> it will be 2:00, 3:00 in the morning or whatever. >>> on today's show, plenty to come on. >> yes. the south american union faces ejection from the imf for allegedly cooking its books about the innation rate. we'll head out to europe where the swiss banking giants could be facing $1.6 billion over libor rate rigging allegations. >> and we'll be on the floor in beijing where china's
normally on boosting growth. >>> well, it's been a rel ofly good year for stocks in europe. adding about .3%. advancers mostly outpacing decliners on the index this morning. if we can zero in on the bourses, it's largely green behind me. the fits fits mib is atting .6%. the ibex in spain, up 0.8%. and the ftse up about 0.3%. now, some company-specific news this morning, fin mechanica saying shares up 2.4%. this on news they're set to buy sge-avio. safran is also a company considering that change. let's take a quick look at the bond space. we'll get a sense of the kind of trade we're seeing shaping up. it is consistent with flows into the periphery, perhaps out of the core and the risk on move generally that we're seeing this morning. yields up to 4.5 roughly in italy at about 5.4%, respectively. gilt is moving up towards is.9% this morning. the bund yield is still extremely low, so that spread between gilt and bund is widening. look at the euro/dollar. 1 1.3171. extraordinary. we're almost up at that 1.32 level. the dollar/yen is flat, right about 83.88. there we go. a little bit of movemen
data showing the private sector has expanded for the first time since april and signaling europe could avoid a recession in q4. >>> and japan's business sentiment sours in the fourth quarter. this reading comes two days before a nationwide vote that suggests it will hand the ldp position a landslide win. >>> we're going to give you all the latest results from the flash december data for the pmi for the eurozone that we're just getting out. the overall, the deposit is a touch stronger for the month of december. the details show the manufacturing weakened slightly and its services strengthened slightly. they are overall still in negative territory. and we're seeing the euro/dollar respond a little bit to the downside. down about 0.01% trying to fight back into flat on the day. 130.75 is the level there. again, the services pmi is at 47.8. compared with the 47 that was expected. it's a five-month high. the manufacturing pmi, 46.1. the manufacturing all told, 46.3. that's a bit under the poll of 46.6. with more on the reaction to these figures, we have rob doddson with us. rob, welcome. it
losing month in nine years for mcdonald's, but they're doing well for breakfast and in europe. lori: thank you as always. melissa: president obama had to try to seeking more support for the fiscal cliff plan. peter barnes is here with the latest. >> just over an hour they will speak at a diesel engine plant persoextending tax cuts for fedl tax workers. keeping up the pressure on republicans to cave on taxes after the president and speaker john boehner met at the white house yesterday in a spokesperson said discussions with the white house are taking place, but we have no details to share about the substance of those conversations. they say perhaps the best strategy for them is to accept some higher tax rate the president is demanding, get that off the table and combat entitlement reform early next year the president can work for increasing the debt ceiling. republicans will have a little bit more leverage. speak a lot of people putting forward a theory, and i think it has merit for you give the president to 2% increass he is talking about, the rate increase on the top 2%, so there i
at what's been happening in europe, you'll see a similar story there. actually a little stronger gains. in france, the cac up by about two-thirds of 1%. in germany, the dax up by 0.4% and ftse in london is up by a quarter percent. in asia overnight, you did see the hang seng down by about 1.2%. shanghai composite down, as well, down by 1%. in consider rea, the kospi up by 0.6%. oil prices have been a little weaker. down by about seven crept cents. and ten year note yielding 1.61%. that's been stuck in a tight range for quite a while. take a look at the dollar this morning. you'll see the euro at this point is still above 1.30, 1.3029 even though the dollar down across the board. dollar-yen at 82.10. gold prices this morning are up by about $8. as the fiscal cliff approaches, we're wondering what we can expect from the markets. our guest hosts again barry knapp and richard bernstein. barry, you're concerned about the direction the talks have taken. >> yeah, it's interesting as i actually traveled through europe last week, there is all this focus on the timing of getting a deal. but ther
's largest trading partner, europe's economy remains on prepares you footing despite several months of relative calm and there's a growing debate abt whher e u.k should lead the e.u. earlier this month we covered the "economist" magazine read "good-bye europe, look what happened when britain left the e.u. " i'm pleased to have george osborne back on this program and back at this table. >> thank you very much. >> rose: you're in new york city for a speech at the manhattan institute. >> i did that last night and had some meetings on wall street, seeing them there later. >> rose: so what's your message about the british economy to manhattan institute as well as the mayor and wall street? >> well, the basic message is itaiis on for business. if you want to come and invest in a country that is dealing with its problems, cutting its business taxes, providing opportunities for companys to go britain is the place. i think we're doing better. >> rose: you do? >> i certainly do. >> rose: the numbers don't look like that. >> well, actually, look at the u.k. compared to many western economies,
america will benefit and have a positive economic gain if we export lng offshore to europe, and or asia and to other countries that need our gas. melissa: we have so much natural gas unlocked as a result of fracking, the problem is, intellectually, emotionally we can never wrap our heads on exporting energy. we're sure we have to keep it all for ourselves. do you think we can get over the hurdle, and that the president and washington in general can get over that hurdle? >> that is a great point, melissa. what you're describe something protectionism. you're right, america has a history of wanting to protect our assets and i think that's great but i think the scenario we're looking at now is unprecedented. america has so much natural gas i think we can fuel our transportation, power generation and domestic energy needs and actually export the surplus. it could be a cake and eat it too scenario. within eight years or now seven years as we turn into the new 2013 year it could be $50 billion economic impact to this country. so we're tripping over dollars to try to save pennies. weemight be a
with christine lagarde from the imf. i asked about the reforms that were taking place in europe. i asked, would any of these reforms be taking place without europe being in a fiscal crisis mode? her answer was, absolutely not. unless the revolver is at the temple of the politicians with the finger on the trigger, they're not capable of summoning the collective will to tell the people that represent that they need to take steps to resolve a problem and will cause disappointment and pain to do so. my experience in the years i have had in politics was exactly that. we never would have gotten what we did in 2011 without the threat of defaulting on our debt. to think that we could put a structure in place today that perhaps we would all be comfortable with in terms of solving our long-term problems and be assured that 10 years or not that congress would not have modified that dozens of times to the response of into joints who are banging on the door and saying this is to develop much pain, we could hardly sustain a policy for months around here, let alone 10 years. if you want to fix the long-term s
we gone bankrupt last year, europe would have ended. so they sent in monty to manage the situation in order for the german and french banks to get their money back. the ucb printed out -- ecb print out money used to help our banks but do not use it to finance our businesses. they give it to them buy to see buy back their debt to help french and german banks. that was monty's work. and in the meantime, our debt went up. >> reporter: and by the way, the five-star movement is number two in the polls. but he's not really a politician. he is a comedian. not kidding. he actually is a comedian. we also managed to catch up with the politician who's more serious about becoming the next prime minister, who has 30% of the votes in the latest polls, his name is mr. bercani. you know him. we'll show you that in the next hour. now it is time for your "global markets report." >>> all right. thank you very much. we are slightly weighted to the upside here. the european equity grind-up rally continues. advances outpaced decliners about 5-4. the dow jones 600, the ftse flat up three points. the dax
. secondly the steel making coal which is used in europe brazil and in asia and we are one of the top three exporters of that coal in the world, and as the recovery in steel production increases in asia and in europe and latin america, that should be better for demand for that coal and hopefully pricing and really benefits most of the coal companies. ashley: steel prices firming as well. >> it seems that way, yes. ashley: the epa has been tough on the coal industry. >> you have said it, yeah. ashley: does that have an impact? >> it has. you know, certainly the equities were discounting a romney victory back in november. got hit pretty hard afterwards. now the stocks are back to where it was prior to the election. in my view, there's not much more major harm that the epa and other regulation can do to the coal industry. but certainly as the economy dictates demand, electricity generation and more confidence, that will be more important than say the epa. the epa has done their damage for the most part. you can never say never but i think most of the negative news is behind coal for the epa. a
of the army? >> they are roughly 123,000 total. but pago is roughly the size of western europe. there are about 6000 deployed. no, that is the minusco, 6000 deployed in the east purdum i do not know the exact number of the congolese military in the east because it is a vast amount of area they are trying to cover with military troops. >> why is this such a big issue for the drc in order to be able to basically prevail in this situation? >> a slight provision -- revision. i think probably today, the m23 probably has up to 2000 troops. the sign -- i think he has pointed out the size of the congo, but i think it is important to graphically described the congo as a country that is as large as the eastern part of the united states from the atlantic to the mississippi. it is an enormous country, and since the split of sudan, it is geographically the largest in africa. the eastern congo is one of the most of a cold areas in which to operate -- one of the most difficult areas in which to operate. it is deeply for arrested in some places. and in -- is deeply forested. in some cases, a d
an extended victory tour wowing fans across europe, but his first stop was the party are at rebel headquarters. he knows that seymour can trust are key components to peak performance. >> to look back what we have achieved as a team in the last three-four years, it is the emotions we have, believing until the last lap of the race that they could not be crazier. in the end, the winner takes at all. it's just tastes of the best when you are on the top step. >> they will be a try to keep together their winning team. he will be extending his contract until 2014 with rebel racing. -- red bull racing. >> much more after the break. >> including the eu address. stay with us. >> if you have never traveled around the country, you have probably climbed on to retrain. >> trains could just about everywhere in the national network has enjoyed competition protection for decades which has ended and long-distance domestic bus services taking into the road. >> the passengers are tired on this bus from frankfurt to berlin, but many welcome the new long distance lines as an alternative to trains. >> it is cheaper,
, businesses started cutting back aggressively. and i think that was partly because of concern over europe. conference over china. businesses are running very, very clean right now. i do think there's capacity. >> and maybe that business investment will help the consumer who will feel the pinch of higher taxes? >> that's the hope ultimately is that you get that multiplier. businesses and corporations have been doing well, they have cash on the balance sheets and they start lending. i think one of the other crucial components is credit creation. it can't just come from large corporations. it has to come from medium and small bess. >>> coming up, bob doll gives us his outlook for the fed. linking rates to the unemployment rate. then at 8:00 eastern, a cnbc exclusive, david tepper, one of the world's top performing hedge fund managers will give us some of his investing wisdom and what will be a can't miss "squawk box" interview coming right back. [ penélope ] i found the best cafe in the world. nespresso. where i never have to compromise on anything. ♪ where just one touch creates the perf
not too concerned. futures up 21 points. decent data out of europe, we will talk about in a minute what a day for the asian markets again. also coming up. our road map begins at andrews air force base where the president arrives in a couple of hours, cutting his hawaiian vacation short to address the fiscal cliff s there really any hope in the last attempt? does the market fade if there's no news tomorrow night? >> the nikkei continues its 21-month run. how much is the boj willing to put up with? >> looking a at potential strike in the nation's port on the east and southern coast, the first since '77 that could cost retailers and importers billions. businesses now asking its white house to get involved. >>> you can now get the nokia lumia for free, depending on the service provider contract you sign s that standard practice or a sign the company's flagship phone suspect selling well? >>> we will start off with news about the fiscal cliff. congress returning to capitol hill today to try to get a deal done on the cliff before the deadline on december 31st. senate majority leader harry rei
your vision should be for adapting the paa that's in europe into asia? because leaders here have said they would like to do some sort of paa in asia. >> well, you asked a lot of questions in there. >> [inaudible] [laughter] >> well, let me talk about the sbx in general. you know, the sbx was built as a research and development platform. it wasn't designed to be in a long-term ballistic missile defense architecture. it still has benefit in research and development, but since it was built, my estimation is that the overall sophistication of the bmd capabilities have grown, and it's grown globally so that the need to have sbx in that role has diminished over time because other capabilities are mature enough to be able to not have to have it. as far as the ability for the intercepters to be productive, i think you have to look across all of technologies that we've pursued in bmd and recognize the that the significant technological challenges that have been associate with the that program and really i think you have in the time frame that we've had to develop these systems, i think we've d
things worse. europe is doing it, southern europe. it keeps raising. the economy contracts even more. about to go in recession. japan raising taxes. why in the world we would apply that poison to ourselves. lori: that is the ultimatum from the white house, as you know. because of the president's reelection they have the leverage. so are the republicans going to have any choice but to cave especially on the issue of raising taxes for higher-income americans? >> well, there are small business owners. 63 percent, and people who create capitol, invest capital. we have seen in europe and france especially, that kind of thing does not work. he does not have a mandate to hurt the economy which is the way the republicans should phrase this thing. why harm the economy now. lori: edges of the economy fall off the cliff to iraq or raising the tax on the wealthy. >> with the republicans should do, making the point they're raising taxes is a bad thing to do, let's postpone this bank. better to do that than to give poison to the patient now. our economy is starting to slow again. give people pause
right after the open. as for the action in europe, taking its cues from the united states. we'll see a big rally in china extending one of its biggest rallies in three years. we have a mixed bag in europe with italy up by about .2 of 1%. >> we'll do our best to keep focused on the business day. we'll be following the tragic shooting in connecticut, of course. the new york stock exchange will hold a moment of silence to honor the victims in the next few moments, and we'll be looking at the president's call for meaningful action and the politics of gun control. >> let's get to a road map for this morning. it starts with apple. under pressure once again. even dipping below $500 a share at some point this morning. shares will remain range bound near term. iphone 5 sales and cannibalization among the region. >> other concessions from the gop, the speaker proposing tax hikes for millionaires. could this be the tipping point. moving the talks beyond deadlock. >> a big week for earnings. yes, earnings. fedex, research in motion among the companies reporting. so finally maybe we'll be talking
. >> that we're just relieved, and that you don't get the huge bounce. but europe is also tracking what we're doing here. as it should really. our economy is much more important to the globe than what happens in any of those little economies over there. the shares drifting higher in early trading on expectations that a budget deal is closer. in asia, japan's nikkei rising above the 10,000 mark, wow, the first time in more than eight months. still a ways from 50,000. among the catalysts, expectations of more aggressive monetary stimulus from the bank of japan. the boj wraps up a two-day meeting with a policy announcement tomorrow. >>> the world bank in the meantime is raising its 2013 economic growth forecast for china and for developing east asia. the organization says that the region remains resilient despite the lackluster performance of the global economy. the world bank sees china expanding by 8.4% next year. it's expecting that it will be fueled by fiscal stimulus and the faster implementation of large investment projects. today's forecast is higher than an earlier one that was sited
of war. two decades ago, with all eyes on europe, the united states prematurely celebrated victory over communism and an end to the cold war but in 1989, the same year the berlin wall fell, tanks roll spood tiananmen square crushing in a bloody massacre the hopes of the chinese people. while communism was gone in europe it was revitalized in the world's largest nation. pyongyang's missile launch awakens us to a fact that communism still casts a long shadow over asia. the nuclear proliveuation threaten not only our allies in the pacific but our own people as well. in asia the cold war never ended an the united states and south korean forces stand guard together on this last frontier. attempts to engage pyongyang over the past four years have been met with repeated prove cage. the kidnapping of two american journalists, repeated missile launches, one more nuclear test, the sinking of a south korean naval vessel with the loss of 46 lives and the shelling of a south korean island. how much more should we endure before we say enough is enough? sweet talking pyongyang only seems to inspire fu
. didn't raise the maximum amount. that's where we stand. it's another cautious day under way in europe. back to you guys. >> might get my haircut like hers, ross. you know, that anna wintour. that bizarre -- do you think you can manage it? >> a page boy. >> you think you carry that one? >> you'd look awful. >> you know what? we're going to do it. >> you're asking these guys to put me -- >> you'd look good in that one from "dumb & dumber." >> yeah. i make that sound. the most annoying -- you want me to do that? >> no, we don't. >> morgan stanley is trying to bolster lending. some advisers are said to have left the firm due to a lack of lending capacity. you didn't bargain for this, did you? we're asking you about your company. is that okay? >> absolutely. >> greg funding -- we already know he joins us. you did provide investors with an update. >> yes. >> ross, you want to get into this conversation as well? you hear him? >> he's gone. >> he's gone now. our audio guy is drinking or something. what did you tell them? >> i told them that we have a great business in wealth management. we've
fractionally. other news out of europe, debt tieback for from an day to receive additional buyback offers. those would be at deeply discounted prices and that would help lower the country's debt lead. >>> in asia, stocks touched a 16-month high and closed mostly higher on the session with good gains, as you can see, with the kospi up the most, 1.5 points. >> strong nebs out of china which suggest maybe the economy is rebounding more than expected. >> the exports. >> yeah. >> among the catalyst in asia trading today, economic stats out of china. export growths slowed sharply to 2.9% in december. that news j underscores the global headwinds dragging on the economy. but the chinese economy is showing solid signs of a pick up in domestic activity. industrial output was stronger than expected. the country has been saying for years it needs to shift a little bit from the export model the internal consumption. let their middle class grow and not be nearly as dependent on exports. and china's oil demand in november surpassed 10 million barrels per day for the first time ever. the country's crude
all closed in europe. only the uk, french, dutch and spanish stock markets are open and they're going to be closing early. there are now only five trading sessions left in 2012. get your act together. stocks and bonds, solid gains so far this year. the dow has advanced 8% in total. the s&p 500 up almost 14%. the nasdaq has jumped 16%. it's been a good year. the end of the year also means we are just days away from the fiscal cliff, however, and that's the bad news. and looming tax hikes, spending cuts, all of that. both sides warning a very big deal becoming a bit more unlikely. >> and my one bit of advice to speaker boehner is this. you cannot pass a bill with just republicans. on a broad thing like this, you need both. and he has put himself with plan b and sort of an impossible position. he has to get these hard right goes to go along with him. and he and the president were going to say we're going to pass a deal with the majority of republicans and the majority of democrats in the house and senate, we would get a mainstream deal. >> i think we're going to fall out of the fiscal tr
a session low, 0.4% as problems in europe's periphery continue to weigh. a powerful 7.3 magnitude earthquake has struck across japan's northeastern coast. the quake rocked buildings as far as tokyo according to reports. u.s. geological survey said there was no threat in the wider pacific ocean. the yen has been rising to a session high before we got details of that. and right now, you can see dollar-yen at 82.39. 82.17 before that happened. some safe haven in-flows into japanese currency. if there was going to be a wave in terms of tsunami that was going to hit, it would have happened around five, six minutes ago and she had yet to see any specific drop or change in the sea level. so we'll hope that that continues on that particular way. atomic power says no irregularities seen at its nuclear plant. operations are normal after the quake. so we'll keep our eyes on that. and we'll see if there's any further reaction, as well. hurricane sandy is expected to have put a big department in the jobs report out at 8:30. expected to rise by just 80,000. it would be the smallest job growth in five mont
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 106 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)